Dos Caminos’ Fresh Guacamole Recipe

Dos Camino’s fresh guacamole recipe makes the “real deal” guac that is served at the popular New York venue, and it is insanely fresh and delicious.

Dos Caminos' fresh guacamole recipeEver since my friend Cindy sent me a link to Dos Caminos’ fresh guacamole recipe,  I’ve literally made it every night of the week. It is fresh, delicious, healthy (minus the chips), and super quick & easy to make.

Chef Ivy Stark shares on Serious Eats how guacamole is made tableside at New York’s popular Dos Caminos. A slideshow of photos shows step by step how it is done. The keys to this recipe are using the freshest ingredients possible. Also, the first step involves making a chili paste; this is a key factor to releasing the full flavor of the ingredients.

Since falling in love with this guacamole, I’ve kept all the fresh ingredients on hand so that I can make it any time. Here are a few things I want to mention about handling and storing the fresh ingredients you’ll need for this recipe.

Tips on Fresh Ingredients

Dos Caminos' fresh guacamole recipeJalapeno and serrano peppers should be diced with gloved hands! The heat is in the seeds, and if the oils from the seeds get on hands, it can burn cuts or get in your eyes later.

Instead of dicing plum tomatoes, I use fresh salsa that I buy at Costco or Publix. I drain the amount called for and add it in place of tomatoes.

Since I despise dicing onions, I buy a carton of fresh diced and pull from it when making this salsa. If you prefer dicing your own but hate the tears, I highly recommend these savvy onion goggles. I never cut onions without putting these on; my eyes can’t take the fumes.

Fresh limes are a must! I forgot to include them in the photo, but I did add the juice later! I keep a bowl of limes on hand not only for this guac, but to squeeze into my peach tea. I like it better than lemon juice:-)

Dos Caminos' fresh guacamole recipeMake ahead: Peppers and onion can be diced ahead and stored in the fridge. Once made, the guacamole should be eaten within a day or two before it begins oxidizing. The Kitchn shares here how to keep guacamole green; it really works!

After researching and reading online reviews, I just ordered this molcajete for making and serving guac. I looked at expensive versions locally and didn’t like the rough texture; this granite will work great for me. I also ordered this avacado slicer that peels, slices and dices avacado easily and uniformly.

Since it would be totally unhealthy for me to serve this every night with chips, I’ve incorporated some other options for serving guacamole. Some of our favorites are carrot chips (precut bagged are easy), cucumber slices, and Stacy’s pita chips (not great but an alternative to tortilla chips). We also eat this guac as a side dish by itself. It is great spread on toast for breakfast or on top of a burger~no bun needed.

If you make the Dos Caminos version or your own version of fresh guac, please leave comments and share your thoughts. As always, thanks so much for stopping by. Be blessed, and stay savvy!!!

Dos Caminos' Fresh Guacamole
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Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons finely chopped Cilantro leaves
  • 2 Teaspoon finely chopped white onion
  • 2 Teaspoons minced Jalapeno or Serrano (or a mix)
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 2 Large avocados, peeled and seeded. Stark recommends California Haas avocados.
  • 2 Tablespoons finely chopped plum tomato (cored and seeded)
  • 2 Teaspoons fresh lime juice.

Instructions

  • Add 1 tablespoon of cilantro, 1 teaspoon each of onion and the minced chili, and 1/2 teaspoon of salt to a medium bowl or a mortar. Mash together with spoon or pestle until a paste is formed.
  • Dice avocado and gently fold into the paste, leaving some chunks.
  • Add the remaining cilantro, onions, and chilies, and continue to mix.
  • Squeeze fresh lime juice over the top. Gently fold in tomato.
  • Serve with tortilla chips.
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http://www.familysavvy.com/dos-caminos-fresh-guacamole-recipe/

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