The New & Improved Pot Roast Meal: Balsamic Pot Roast & Roasted Vegetables

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Today’s post shares a new favorite of mine–balsamic pot roast with roasted vegetables. It is out of this world delicious and a more sophisticated version of the pot roast meal that most of us grew up eating.

The ingredients at left look quite different from the ones that I used to use when making pot roast. Trust me, I almost caved when preparing this meal. I almost pulled out the cream of mushroom soup and dry Lipton onion soup; that is how I’ve made pot roast for years. I went through a withdrawal of sorts even trying a new method. But I did, and I am thrilled with the results!

The reaction from my family was unanimous. They LOVED the balsamic roast! Zane kept referring to it as “steak” (even after I kept telling him that it was roast). The girls all said it tasted so much better than what I’ve made for years (which they loved)!

For those who love side-by-side comparisons, here is the basic difference between the two roasts.  First, the balsamic roast has a tangy, slightly sweet flavor that is more “sophisticated” than the old way that I cooked roast. The old way (mushroom soup and onion soup) was hearty and delicious, but it was heavy and very simple–nothing complex. The “tang” of the marinade almost makes it hard to tell that this is roast. In fact, Zane was probably calling it steak because the flavor was very much like the Kensington Club steak that he and I used to love (when Steak & Ale was in business years ago).

So, if you are stuck in a roast rut and afraid to crawl out of the familiar box–don’t be! Give this roast a try, and you will absolutely love it!

Here are some tips that I think will make this roast even better:

Brown roast before cooking in crock

Brown roast before cooking in crock

 

Brown the roast before putting in the crock pot. This is hugely important. This gives some darker pieces and a good crust on the roast, and it helps create a glaze that adds tons of flavor.  I brown my roast in canola oil. I cover the meat liberally with garlic pepper and Southern Seasoning and sear until all sides are brown and beginning to crust

Scrape the pan and deglaze for tons of flavor

Scrape the pan and deglaze for tons of flavor

The fat and seasonings left in the pan make a wonderful glaze. I pour just a bit of beef broth into the pan and boil into a reduction. I just pour this into the slow cooker on top of the roast before cooking.

I cut several onions in half and put them in the bottom of the slow cooker, then I put the roast on top to cook. The onions turned out perfectly cooked, so I served them alongside the roast.

Balsamic Pot Roast (from Add A Pinch)

  • 1 3-4 pound boneless roast beef (I use chuck roast)
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  1. Place roast beef into the insert of your slow cooker. In a 2-cup measuring cup, mix together all remaining ingredients. Pour over roast beef and set the timer for your slow cooker. (I cooked 8 hours on low).
  2. Once roast beef has cooked, remove from slow cooker with tongs into a serving dish. Break apart lightly with two forks and then ladle about ¼ – ½ cup of gravy over roast beef.
  3. Store remaining gravy in an airtight container in the refrigerator for another use.

Here are the recipes for the roasted vegetables that I served with the balsamic pot roast. They paired perfectly complemented the rich, flavorful roast.

Roasted Red and Sweet Potatoes.

1. Cut several sweet potatoes and red potatoes into uniform cubes. (Keep submerged in cold water until cooking to prevent browning.)

2. Spread potatoes on large baking sheet; douse liberally with good olive oil. Sprinkle liberally with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.

3. Roast at 450 degrees for 10 minutes; reduce heat to 400 and cook for about 25 minutes more or until potatoes begin to brown.

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This is the pan after my family ate dinner. It was covered with potatoes! Can you tell that everyone loved these?

 

 

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This was what was left of the Brussels Sprouts after dinner. These are like “crack” at our house; we devour them. My recipe for these can be found here on this previous post.

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This is the container of leftovers that I packed for us to eat tomorrow after church. This type of leftovers reheats beautifully and tastes just as good the next day.